Grand jumelé cottage 22' X 32' situé dans un quartier recherché, paisible et familial. Construit en 2002 et aménagé sur 3 étages, vous y retrouverez de grandes pièces de vie bien éclairées par des fenêtres à guillotine. Une cuisine très fonctionnelle avec îlot et un grand rangement ainsi que 4 chambres dont une chambre des maîtres spacieuse avec walk-in et accès privé à la salle de bain.


Desert birds and lizards are predators of C. pallida, and these bees can be parasitized by the meloid beetle (Tegrodera erosa); however, rain is the largest threat to these bees.[12] At night and during the heat of the day, C. pallida bees will hide under rocks, trees, in burrows, etc. When it rains, the bees can get wet. If the bee is in a burrow, it may simply drown. If the bee is underneath something, when night comes, the bee may freeze to death due to the low temperatures in the desert. Since these bees are solitary, they don’t have the protection of a hive or colony; thus, they are more susceptible to the elements.[11]
Centris pallida serve numerous roles for the environment. Like most other bees, they are essential for pollination. Specifically, they pollinate cacti, desert willow, and palo verde.[14] The tunneling ability of these bees aerates the soil, and this allows water from rain to reach plant roots quickly. Their nitrogen rich feces fertilizes the soil.[15] Their stings are mild, so they are not dangerous. The only downside with respect to humans is that their burrowing can leave unsightly mounds. If an area has a large density of burrowing females, then these mounds can be quite noticeable and are difficult to get rid of.[14]

The egg will then hatch within two weeks, and the grub will eat the nourishment that the mother left. The amount of bee bread provided will directly affect the size of the offspring (more food = larger size). When the food has been eaten and the grub has fully developed, the grub will turn into a prepupa. Over the course of eleven months, the prepupa will undergo metamorphosis to become an adult bee. The adult bee will then dig to the surface in late April or early May, and will live for about a month. By late July, virtually no C. pallida can be found.[7]
Real estate brokers are subject to the Real Estate Brokerage Act and must comply with various measures to ensure your protection: they must meet the requirements of the Organisme d’autoréglementation du courtage immobilier du Québec (OACIQ), contribute to the Real Estate Indemnity Fund and hold professional liability insurance. They are responsible for the real estate transaction.
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