Votre recherche de maisons à vendre par province parmi plus de 173372 annonces sur Immoweb.be : maisons (Autre bien, Bien exceptionnel, Bungalow, Chalet, Château, Ferme, Fermette, Immeuble à appartements, Immeuble mixte, Maison, Maison bel-étage, Maison de campagne, Maison de Maître, Pavillon, Villa) à vendre dans les provinces de Anvers, Brabant Flamand, Brabant Wallon, Flandre Occidentale, Flandre Orientale, Hainaut, Liège, Limbourg, Luxembourg, Namur et à Bruxelles-Capitale.
I listed end of november..wks before Christmas...lots of interest on line, but not that many phone calls...tons from Real estate agents...promising all kinds of stuff...& unfortunately my open houses, were either in a snow storm or extremely cold..had more action in february & march...I had over 9,000 visits to my site...the single family house is in a very good location...TIP: if you give an email address... i suggest using the # & street of the house in gmail. easy to remember for future buyers. Offer accepted in march...

Cette maison unifamiliale avec un cachet contemporain est le modèle rêvé pour les petites familles. Le rez-de-chaussée, à aire ouverte, a deux chambres et une salle de bain avec une douche de verre 3’ x 4’. Au sous-sol, vous pourrez créer sur mesure deux chambres, une salle familiale et une deuxième salle de bain. Il ne faut pas oublier le garage à même de la maison.


There is a size correlation which determines whether males become patrollers or hoverers. Patrollers tend to be larger so that they can better protect and copulate with emerging females. Smaller males are usually unable to compete as well, and so have to make the best out of a bad situation; thus, they become hoverers. Each group has a different set of behaviors. The patrollers move over a large space containing many other patrollers. Usually, patrollers will frequent the same spots over the course of their lives. Since the area is so large, the cost to defend it against other patrollers would be much greater than the potential mating benefits, so the patrollers show very little territoriality.[11] Patroller males will usually only fight when a breeding female is near. In contrast, each hoverer stakes out an area of about one meter in diameter. These areas don’t overlap with other hoverers. Any fast moving object (i.e. bee, dragonfly, leaf, etc.) that enters a territory will be quickly chased. The chase allows the male bee to determine if a female is unmated, or if an enemy male is in his territory. If it is a male bee, the territory owner will chase it out, but not beyond the boundary of the territory. What is interesting is that every day (or even every several hours) the territory holder will abandon the area to establish a new zone. Often the male will never return to the vacated area, and it will be taken over by another male. This shows that hoverers show a low site tendency but strong territoriality.[11] A balanced ratio of patrollers to hoverers is maintained, and thus, this ratio is an evolutionary stable strategy. If more males become patrollers, then the hoverers will benefit from the reduced competition, and the hoverers' genes will spread until the stable ratio is returned to. The same thing will happen if more males become hoverers.

Centris pallida was officially discovered and catalogued by William J. Fox in 1899 near Phoenix, Arizona.[1] Fox also discovered Centris cockerelli, Centris errans, and Sphex subhyalinus. This species is closely related to Centris cockerelli in terms of habitat and genus, but is different in terms of mating, color, and subgenus.[2] This bee also belongs to the superfamily Apoidea, and the subfamily Apinae.[1]
They are large (up to 3 cm), fast-flying bees, distinguished from the closely related genus Epicharis by the absence of long, whip-like setae that project backwards from just behind the eyes. They are commonly encountered bees in American deserts, and are active at very high ambient temperatures when many other species are in hiding. They can often be seen in large numbers on desert-willow (Chilopsis) and palo verde (Parkinsonia) blossoms. Bees of this genus are of some economical significance in pollinating crops such as Brazil Nut (Bertholletia excelsa) and Cashew (Anacardium occidentale, pollinated by C. tarsata among others).

Real estate brokers are subject to the Real Estate Brokerage Act and must comply with various measures to ensure your protection: they must meet the requirements of the Organisme d’autoréglementation du courtage immobilier du Québec (OACIQ), contribute to the Real Estate Indemnity Fund and hold professional liability insurance. They are responsible for the real estate transaction.
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